Practical Tips: Make Small Changes

I just did the math and wrote this into a grant proposal for the National Institutes of Health. How big of an impact small changes can have over time…

2 friench fries“An obesity prevention program that was successful in getting its participants to lower their caloric intake by only 25 calories (e.g., 1.75 peanut M&Ms, 2 Doritos or 2.5 French fries) per day would effectively halt unhealthy weight gain in the majority of overweight individuals.”

Point is, you would never notice two fries missing from your extra value meal but that is exactly what is making America fat- consuming just a tiny bit more than what we need to.  Think about it- very few people get fat overnight.  In fact, it’s such a gradual process that most barely even realize it until they have to buy a bigger pant size.  I say, if you’re going to get fat, you should at least enjoy the journey.  Tragedy is people don’t.  We call it passive overconsumption.  Don’t live in denial until you are looking for a dress in a 12 and don’t starve yourself.  Start now, all you have to do is cut out a few calories each day- just the ones you won’t miss!

23 thoughts on “Practical Tips: Make Small Changes

  1. Hi,
    I’d like to know whether or not I am sabotaging my diet goals if my calorie intake is too low. Currently, I should be consuming around 1700 cals a day to achieve my weight loss goals. However, after controlling portion sizes at meal times, I’m getting to around 1200 cal a day. After a workout, I’m down to about 900 cal. Should I be trying to adhere to the 1700 cal a day goal more ?

  2. This is a good alternative, because most diets force you to give up or limit eating your favorite foods, and start you on a diet plan composed of foods that you don’t like.

Leave a Reply to Mounira Selmi Cancel reply